Michael Lacey: Mathematician and a Helper

Michael Lacey was born on September 26, 1959, in Abilene, Texas. He is commonly known as an American mathematician. In 1987, Lacey received his Ph.D. from the prestigious University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign with the guide of his mentor, Walter Phillipp.

Lacey wrote his thesis on the subject of area probability as relating to Banach spaces. In addition, he solved various problems, including those associated with the law of the iterated logarithm functions. After receiving his Ph.D., Lacey mainly worked on mathematical probabilities, ergodic theory, and quite possibly his most significant work: harmonic analysis.

One of his first career positions after his Ph.D. were at the Lousiana State University (LSU) and the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill (UNC). At UNC, Lacey and his guidance, Walter Philipp, presented their evidence for the central limit theorem. Learn more about Michael Lacey: https://www.genealogy.math.ndsu.nodak.edu/id.php?id=62509 and https://scholar.google.com/citations?user=CVXnps0AAAAJ&hl=en

Later between 1989 and 1996, Lacey held valuable positions at the Indiana University — a place where he received the National Science Foundation Fellowship award for postdoctorates.

In addition, he began studying bilinear Hilbert transform, which was the subject of debates by Alberto Calderon (an Argentinian mathematician known for developing the theory of singular integral operators). It was also the same subject that Lacey and his partner, Christoph Thiele, had resolved years earlier.

After his tenure with the fellowship and Indiana University, Lacey became a Professor of Mathematics at the Georgia Institute of Technology (one of the top colleges in the nation). Since then, he has received multiple awards, including the Salem Price and Guggenheim Fellowship; amongst others. Read more: Michael Lacey | Wikipedia and Michael Lacey |Math Alliance

More recently in 2012, Lacey became a member of the American Mathematical Society, which is an organization of mathematicians serving research and scholarships while holding national meetings to discuss relevant details.

Numerous students have gained scholarships with Lacey’s guidance. In fact, he had lead grants such as VIGRe and MCTP, leading students into becoming graduates and postdocs; altogether, Lacey has guided 10 postdocs.

Additionally, he has written a book named “On a Conjecture of E.M. Stein on the Hilbert Transform on Vector Fields.” Today, Lacey enjoys traveling and experiencing different cultures.